The most expensive car in British history sells for £17.500.000

The most expensive car in British history sells for £17.500.000

Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance is the most anticipated event of the year for the fans of legendary vintage cars, and one of the vehicles that took everyone’s breath away at this year’s show was Aston Martin DBR1. The 1950s classic model set the record for the most expensive British car ever sold at an auction, after reaching an enormous £17.500.000 price.

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Described as “the most important Aston Martin ever produced”, this car was driven by several legends of British racing scene in the 1950. It was the first in the series of five Aston Martin DBR1s built between 1956 and 1958, developed by racing design chief Ted Cutting. It was purposely built to race in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, but never ended up as a winner at this event, even though it paved a way to success for one of the future models in 1959. It did, however, lead Sir Stirling Moss to an amazing victory at the 1000-kilometer Nürburgring race that same year.

Despite the fact the £17.500.000 price tag looks gigantic to most people, Ian Kelleher of RM Sotheby’s considers it reasonable for the vehicle of its calibre – after all, Aston Martin is known for producing a very limited number of cars in the same series.

“When you’re looking at a car that is so historically significant, the price lines up. Because Aston Martin, over its history, hasn’t made as many cars as some of the other marques, we’ve seen strong gains in the last 10 years alone for cars such as the DB4 or DB5. They’re fantastic to drive, easy to own, spacious and sporting. They’ll continue to go up,” explained Mr. Kelleher.

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